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Laboratory  

ext 4217
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Curriculum Vitae
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Publications
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Other

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Shainn-Wei Wang, Ph.D.

E-mailGswwang@mail.ncku.edu.tw 

TELG06-2353535 ext 4218

FAXG06-2095845

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Educations / Professional Experience

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Educations

Diploma:

  • 9/1996-9/1992: Ph.D. The Pennsylvania State University (Genetics)

  • 9/1992-9/1990: M.S. The Pennsylvania State University (Genetics)

  • 1983-1987:  B.S. Fu-Jen Catholic University (Biology)

@ Thesis:
  • Wang, S.-W. (1996). Biochemistry and cellular biology of the interaction of Bacillus thuringiensis CryIC toxin with Spodoptera exigua midgut epithelial cells in vitro.  The Pennsylvania State University.  Ph.D. dissertation.

  • Wang, S.-W. (1992). Purification and characterization of the Platinota idaeusalis baculovirus pathogenic to Apple bud moth. The Pennsylvania State University.  M.S. dissertation

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Current Position 8/2005-current Adjunct Assistant Professor,The National Health Research Institute of Clinical Medicine and Department of Pathology
@ 8/2004-current Adjunct Assistant Professor,The Institute of Basic Medical Science of NCKU
@ 8/2004- current

Assistant Professor,Institute of Molecular Medicine, National Cheng Kung University Medical College

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Professional Appointments

@ 9/1997- 7/2004 Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Harvard Medical School/Childrens Hospital
@ 9/1996-9/1997 Postdoctoral Research associate, Pesticide Research Laboratory, Inter-college program in Genetics, The Pennsylvania State University
@ 1993-1996 Research assistant, Pesticide Research Laboratory, The Pennsylvania State University
@ 1989-1990 Research technician, Fu-Jen Catholic University, Microbiology Laboratory
@ 1986-1987 Internship (HPLC certificate), Asian Vegetable Research and Development Center, Plant physiology Department
@ 1985-1986 Internship: Fu-Jen Catholic University, Plant Ecology La
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@ Major Administration Activities & Services
  • 8/2004-8/2009: Bio-safety P3 Lab Committee, NCKU, College of Medicine

  • 8/2004-8/2009: IMM Faculty Recruitment Committee, NCKU, Medical School

  • 8/2005-8/2009: IMM Graduate Student Recruitment Committee

  • 8/2005-8/2006: IMM Teaching Coordination and Improvement Committee, NCJU, Medical School

@  Affiliations
  • AAAS (American Association for the Advancement of Science)

  • SAPA (Sino-American Pharmaceutical Professionals Association-New England)

  • GSAS Harvard Biotechnology Club

  • TSAB (Taiwan Scholar Association in Boston)

  • TAS (Taiwan AIDS Society)

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Expertise /Research Interests

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Immunology (DNA vaccine, mucosal and cellular immunity)

Microbiology (Bacillus, Retroviruses, Baculovirus)

Advanced Virology (Viral entry, assembly and budding)

Cellular Biochemistry (Protein biochemistry, vesicular trafficking, membrane signaling)

Molecular Genetics (Transcriptional/translational regulation, advanced genetics, and developmental biology)

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We have previously found that multiple mutations in the basic region of NC in the HIV Gag structural polyprotein did not affect Gag assembly on the plasma membrane, but resulted in the production of unstable viral particles without viral RNA, which disintegrated immediately after budding. However, full recovery of intact RNA-minus particles was achieved by functional disruption of viral protease (D25S point mutation). Therefore, RNA is not crucial for retroviral assembly but plays a critical role in maintaining structural stability of the viral particle during protease mediated maturation (see attached figure). We have exploited this discovery to generate HIV DNA molecular clone harboring NC, protease, and other mutations that were able to efficiently produce non-infectious viral particles in vitro. Vaccination of the proviral DNA mutant in a prime boost strategy in monkeys has shown significant success in protecting chronic infection of the wild type virus after challenge in a monkey model. Molecular engineering of the mutant provirus harboring a potent microbial protein adjuvant in together with the use of cytokines for immune enhancing are in progress.

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  My long term goals are to:

(1) understand the pathogenesis of epidemic virus in Asia: We are interested in finding out how the gene networks are reprogrammed in DC, Macrophage, and T cells in responding to viral infections. Gene chips and Flow cytometry techniques will be used to investigate possible pathogenic mechanisms related to apoptosis or other cellular signaling events.

(2) identify host restriction factors for viral infection: For example, by comparing protein profiles of susceptible cells to those of non-susceptible cells when exposed to virus or viral proteins, we will investigate the cellular factor(s) that have direct protein-protein interaction with viral protein(s) in restricting viral entry, assembly, genome encapsidation, or replication. Tandem affinity purification for protein complex (Tap-Tag) and mass spectrometry will be used to explore the protein network related to the species-specific resistance of viral infection.

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@ My current ongoing projects cover:
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  1. HIV vaccine development and mucosal immunity

  2. Identification of the cellular protein network for HIV nucleocapsid during Gag transport and selective RNA packaging

  3. Proteomic analysis of the HCV core-interacting cellular protein network in hepatocytes and immune cells

  4. Development of a multivalent retroviral/flaviviral chimeric vector vaccine against HCV and HIV.

  5. Investigation of Influenza A virus NS1 protein on the role of circumventing cytokine responses and the associated functional cellular protein network leading to increased virulence

  6. Effective detection of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in infants from eropositive pregnants by using padlock probes

  7. HIV surveillance & Resistance in Southern-Taiwan

@  My long term goals are to:
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  1. understand the pathogenesis of epidemic virus in Asia: We are interested in finding out how the gene networks are reprogrammed in DC, Macrophage, and T cells in responding to viral infections. Gene chips and Flow cytometry techniques will be used to investigate possible pathogenic mechanisms related to apoptosis or other cellular signaling events.

  2. identify host restriction factors for viral infection: For example, by comparing protein profiles of susceptible cells to those of non-susceptible cells when exposed to virus or viral proteins, we will investigate the cellular factor(s) that have direct protein-protein interaction with viral protein(s) in restricting viral entry, assembly, genome encapsidation, or replication. Tandem affinity purification for protein complex (Tap-Tag) and mass spectrometry will be used to explore the protein network related to the species-specific resistance of viral infection